Evolution is “still” controversial

In the avalanche of media coverage of Charles Darwin at the moment, due to the bicentenary of his birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On The Origin of Species by Natural Selection, I keep hearing in the media that the theory of evolution by natural selection is still controversial today.
It isn’t.
What’s controversial are the views of people who, against all of the evidence, doggedly refuse to admit that the theory may possibly be right, and who base their argument on nothing other than the fact that they don’t want it to be right.
If the theory of evolution by natural selection were to ever be proved wrong, due to the uncovering of incontrovertible evidence against it, I’d be happy to abandon it myself, as I’m sure would almost everybody else who believes in it, but until then it’s actually the least controversial theory about human origins that’s available.
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2 Comments

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2 responses to “Evolution is “still” controversial

  1. Jeff

    I know that there are a number of elements that have stemmed from Darwin’s writings that are supported by real science. Genetic trait inheritance for example seem to support elements of his thoughts. What I find disturbing though is that his book was written before our accepted scientific method was established, and some of his more elaborate theories are reliant on previous experiments in Spontaneous Generation.

    Spontaneous Generation (for those who don’t know) was a theory that living matter can be created from non-living matter. This belief was supported by “experiments” that involved placing objects in a container, leaving them for up to a month, then opening the container to find that (for example) the grain had disappeared, but there was now a small family of mice living in the container; mice that had been “Spontaneously Generated.” What Dr. Jan Baptista von Helmont (among other “researchers”) ignored was the small holes that had also suprisingly appeared in the box in the mean time.

    I think there is a little of the “I don’t believe it because I don’t want to believe it” going on from both sides of the evolution/creation argument.

    Just a thought.

  2. John

    Spontaneous Generation experiments? I seem to have missed that episode of Monty Python’s Flying Circus. Where can I obtain it, it sounds absolutely absurd.

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